Heritage & History

The following are excerpts from Dover Town Plan.
 
Dover was settled in 1779 by Captain Abner Perry of Hollister, Massachusetts. The real history of Dover began when a Vermont Charter, signed by Governor Thomas Chittenden, head of the newly formed Vermont Republic, was granted on November 7, 1780, to William Ward of Newfane and sixty associates. This parcel of land containing about 26,464 acres was incorporated into a township named Wardsborough. A petition to divide the Town of Wardsborough into north and south was signed on September 25, 1878. On October 30, 1810, the Legislative Assembly passed an Act to incorporate Wardsborough and Dover into separate towns; the south district called Dover.
 
The early 1900's brought the beginning of the tourist industry to the area. Summer residences were established on the Handle Road and Cooper Hill. Many of the local residents began taking in summer boarders. People would come by train by way of Wilmington and Brattleboro to spend one week to the whole summer at various farms throughout the town.
 
In 1953, Walter Schoenknecht of East Haven, Connecticut, purchased the Ruben Snow farm, and turned it into the Mount Snow Ski Area. This marked the beginning of the Dover we see today. In the beginning there were only a couple of ski lodges in the area. The summer boarders became a thing of the past, and practically everyone who had a spare room or attic began taking in skiers. As time went on, lodges and motels began to spring up, as well as restaurants, stores, ski shops, and nightclubs.
 
The early skier was often brought in to Mount Snow by sleigh or Bombardier when the road to the mountain was dirt and impassable by car. A new access road, now Route 100, was built and paved.
 
Vacation home developments sprang up near the base of the mountain. An airport and golf course were also built. Mount Snow established its now famous Golf School in the 1970s.
 
In 1996, Mount Snow was sold to the American Skiing Company. The company built the Grand Summit Hotel and Conference Center.
 
The Town of Dover is in the center of southern Vermont. The entire town covers 35.8 square miles, which is characterized by mountainous terrain. These ranges have elevations reaching over 2500 feet.
A bit of history of Company F, 16th Regiment Vermont Volunteer Infantry

The Town of Dover recently restored a Civil War Military Register, listing the members of Company F, 16th VT Regiment, which includes residents from the Dover area who fought with this regiment. The original document is now framed under glass and stored in our vault. We have reproduced it to an 11x17 poster which is available for purchase.  Currently, it can be viewed at the Town Office.

~~A bit of history of Company F, 16th Regiment Vermont Volunteer Infantry~~

The 16th Regiment, Vermont Volunteer Infantry (or 16th VVI) was a nine months' infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

It served in the eastern theater, predominantly in the Defenses of Washington, from October 1862 to August 1863. It was a member of the 2nd Vermont Brigade.

The 16th Vermont Infantry, a nine months regiment, was raised as a result of President Abraham Lincoln's call on August 4, 1862, for additional troops due to the disastrous results of the Peninsula Campaign.

It was recruited in Windsor and Windham Counties, the two southernmost counties in the state, and company F. was organized in Wilmington on September 3, 1862, recruited by Henry F. Dix.

The regiment rendezvoused at Brattleboro on October 9, and was mustered into the United States service on October 23, with 949 officers and men. They left Brattleboro on October 24, and arrived in Washington, D.C. on the morning of October 27, going into camp near the other four regiments that were then formed into the 2nd Vermont Brigade.

 

Major engagements:

Fairfax Court House, January 1863

Union Mills, March-June 1863

Bristoe Station--June 1863

Gettysburg--July 1863

Pursuit of Lee--July 1863

Mustered out August 10, 1863

 

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 23 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 48 Enlisted men by disease. Total 73.